THE EIGHTEENTH CHALLENGE

WRITE A RADICALLY ACCESSIBLE PLAY

WRITE A RADICALLY ACCESSIBLE PLAY

The thing about disability is that everyone has been touched by it. You don’t have to start getting out the books or searching ADA websites.

KEEP THIS PERSONAL

Write a play that beautifully highlights and incorporates the physical or mental limitations of those around you in a way that those attributes are dealt with in a dignified and beautiful way that is part of the human experience: write for your grandparent, for your OCD, for your back injury, your sleep apnea.

Addressing fear. There are a lot of assholes. Do this out of love. Do it boldly. From my experience within the d/Deaf and disabled community, that will buy you everything. You can’t write without being “checked” anymore. That world is gone.

“Take risks, and don't be afraid to get caught trying," Hillary Clinton

We don’t need to idolize disability. It’s not great. Don’t do that.  Do have fun making an environment that eliminates or eases or becomes advantageous for those who have developed coping mechanisms for disability.

Soft bigotry of low expectations- don’t set the bar low here.

Expansion:

I was asked recently as part of a theater panel “what people mean when they talk about diversity in theater”

I had a lot of things to talk about, but the one I had the most background in was disability.

Disability. It’s a thing people. It’s (perhaps) the most overlooked part of diversity/inclusion efforts.

I have Crohn’s Disease. It’s in remission. It’s a great disease for denial. I love it for that. But at times I can’t guarantee (at all) that I’m going to be able to take a train to work for 45 minutes without shitting myself. That… ladies and gentlemen is disabling.

I’m so proud to be part of a theater company that has an award-winning academic paper declaring the need for a new category of Radical Accessibility as a result of our work. “Radical” is because our work equally “others” (verb) the able-bodied in the room to create a new paradigm of normal- a new hierarchy of power and beauty within the work.

Um… more.

DON’T FUCKING ACCOMMODATE disability if you don’t have to.

I mean, do. It’s the low bar limit. It’s not the same as making it ACCESSIBLE.

Accommodation is a heavy ugly addition to the pure product… a product that could have been designed in an accessible manner.

Also, don’t try to please everyone or include everyone. You can’t. You just can’t and have beauty. That’s another part of the discussion- and an important one.

But you can and MUST challenge yourself to be Radically Accessible to SOME and use that new paradigm to make art that is worthy of ALL.

Love to you